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20130416
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
quintanilla with jim cramer, david faber. after three days of triple digit moves on the dow, futures finally appear to be taking somewhat of a breather as we are knee-deep in earnings. lot of big names reporting today. jobless claims inching up a few moments ago. europe has had a pretty good bond auction, both in france and in spain. today, although italy's parliament still struggling to elect a president in their first vote. our road map begins with all that market volatility. we were up, then down, then up. we'll look at whether another triple digit move on the dow today could play out. >>> apple dipped below $400 a share yesterday. closed above that. this morning verizon reporting strong activations for the iphone for the last quarter. will that help this stock that's been in free fall? >>> pepsi beating expectations this morning. jim has an interview with the ceo. >>> paypal under pressure this morning, facing increased competition from amazon and others. we'll break down numbers and talk exclusive to john donahoe, ebay's ceo coming up. >>> futures on the rise after yesterday's drop of 1
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)